Order No. 184

BENIGN DUPLICATES

Book
Softcover, 200×260 mm, 128 pages, first edition of 10 copies. English.
Gluschenkoizdat, 2019.
〈...〉 In writing down his every step, Kozakov remains unknowable, like outer space — the conquest of which he devotes so much attention to in his notes. Who is he? A man of the ‘60s? An intellectual wretch? Your father’s older brother? Anti-Semite? Loser? Poet? Extraterrestrial? The diary is clearly not intended for anyone else to read: Kozakov writes it for himself and remains hermitically sealed within its text, exposing the reader to the principal and tragic impenetrability of “the Other.” Kozakov’s peculiar relationship with reality has no parallel in today’s world. It is like a message in a bottle that he sent not 50, but 500 years ago 〈...〉 Maria Kuvshinova, “A Little Life”

Order No. 120

PSKOV

Book
280 pages, 210×260 mm, Russian, English, French, German. Edition of 10 copies.
Gluschenkoizdat, 2016
I’d spent the previous night, like every other night that summer, on two soft armchairs put together to form a comfortable and even spacious (for my little eight year old body) sleeping place. Before going to bed, I always watched the Vremya broadcast: as the minute hand neared the ‘9:00’ mark, the alarming music started to play, the map of Russia flew in front of our eyes for some reason, and then the newscasters appeared. I listened to the news about the construction of another thermal power station and the record harvest, glancing from time to time at the screen that was glimmering away in the dark. The troubled voices of the newscasters gradually calmed down, turning into a vague babble. Under the subdued murmur of the news stream about the decline of the Soviet Union, I slowly fell into a sweet slumber.

V-A-C Moscow

OUR DAYS ARE RICH AND BRIGHT

Personal Exhibition
Exhibition took place at a former Moscow factory in Polkovaya Street, not far from where the publishing houses ‘Prosveshchenie’ and ‘Detskaya Kniga’ were located.
Our Days are Rich and Bright presents a selection of ‘Glushchenkoizdat’ books illustrating the aesthetic legacy of the Soviet era preserved in towns as diverse as Pskov, Dresden, Ulyanovsk, Riga, Pärnu, Tallinn and Tartu. Another work featured in the exhibition is a volume of found diaries belonging to a bus driver named Nikolai Kozakov. Glushchenko has chosen to publish Kozakov’s diary entries from the year 1962 in the form of a 624-page book covering his daily routine, his love life as well as anecdotes from everyday encounters. We learn that Kozakov graduated from the Moscow University with the hope of becoming a teacher, something that never materialised due to a speech impediment. The entries reveal both bleak and heart-warming sides to life in Soviet Union. The diary is brought to life in the form of a sound recording played inside custom-made booths, read by a well-known Soviet presenter whose voice is instantly recognisable. The show also features postcards from the towns the artist has visited and 60s style furniture. A sign with the name of the publishing house ‘Glushchenkoizdat’ will also be placed on top of the building for the duration of the show.

Order No. 150

VENETS. WELCOME TO THE IDEAL

Book
ISBN 9–785990–951914.
Softcover, 200×260 mm, 320 pages, 500 copies. English.
Gluschenkoizdat, 2017
Order €35
THE ARCHITECTURAL REVIEW (by Owen Hatherley): This wonderful book documents the architectural results of another Soviet anniversary – the celebrations of the centenary of Lenin’s birth in Ulyanovsk, formerly Simbirsk, the small city on the Volga where he was born. Told by the authorities in Moscow that the ‘door would be open’ for them to modernise their mainly wooden, one-storey, Tsarist city for the duration of the celebrations, and that they’d close it immediately when it was over, the local Party rushed to build a Museum, a Library, a Palace of Culture, housing, an Airport and the high-rise Hotel Venets before the tap of money and resources was turned off. In its first year of opening, two Poles, 70 Britons, and more than 3,000 East Germans arrived to stay in the Hotel Venets, and we get to read the inventory of difficult questions they answered (‘can we see how people live in those little wooden houses?’), and find out how hotel staff took it out on the guests.