Born in Kaliningrad in 1983, Gluschenko’s work sees him as head of a fictional publishing house called ‘Gluschenkoizdat’, of which he is also the sole employe—a reporter of sorts—who spends his time visiting small towns in Russia and former Eastern bloc, to take photograph and publish books about them. His photography explores the landscape of Soviet serial modernism.
Museum der bildenden Künste Leipzig

»VENEZ«. WILLKOMMEN IM IDEAL

Installation

“The group exhibition marking the 15th Marion Ermer Prize for the promotion of young contemporary artists in eastern Germany features work by the award-winners Fine Bieler, Ronny Bulik, Kirill Gluschenko and Jana Schulz. The four artists convinced the jury with their entries in the fields of photography, installation and video art.”
“Endowed with prize money of EUR 5,000 each, the award — which includes a group exhibition and four individual catalogues dedicated to the award-winners — is again being held in cooperation with the MdbK.”

Curated by Elizabeth Youngman

Marion-Ermer Stiftung
Museum der bildenden Kunste Leipzig
Elizabeth Youngman, “On Behalf of Gluschenkoizdat”: Kirill Gluschenko is not only an artist but also the founder and sole employee of the Gluschenkoizdat publishing house. This, at first glance, is not an unusual combination in the art world. But the publishing house is fictional, although it is all too real in the life and work of the artist. His works are commissioned by Gluschenkoizdat. He does not travel as an artist to the places where his works are created, but as the publisher's representative. Gluschenko thus establishes a constructed framework for himself in which he pursues his artistic work. The artist orientates himself on the Soviet publishing industry of the 1960s to 1980s and, according to his perceptions, tries to recreate the working conditions of the time as authentically as possible. He travels primarily on regional trains and stays in hotels from the Soviet era. Since 2010 Gluschenko publishes his works under the name Gluschenkoizdat and thereby allows his fictitious publishing house to appear in public. As an artist, he sometimes withdraws entirely behind it. However, the playful choice of the name (a combination of his surname Gluschenko with the Russian “izdat” as the final syllable—the short form of “Izdatelstvo,” which means “publishing house” and was part of many earlier Soviet publishing house names) always enables ascription. Read more...

Order No. 184

VENETS. INTRODUCTION

Video
Introduction to “Venets” project for the exhibition “Marion-Ermer Preis” at Museum der bildenden Künste Leipzig.

“…The Moscow train pulls into Ulyanovsk early in the morning. These days the city welcomes you with bustling streets and squares, the courtyards and guardians the scarlet shade of leaves that have not yet fallen, the mirrored vitrines of shops, and a myriad of new buildings. If there’s anything particularly characteristic of Ulya­novsk’s new look, it is the construction cranes and scaffolding.”
V-A-C Venice

VENETS. ASCENSION TO ‘OLYMPUS’

Installation

Heading off on assignment, an employee of Gluschenkoizdat spent seventeen days in the ‘Venets’ Hotel. During this time, the correspondent stayed one night in a room on each floor, working his way up floor-by-floor from the bottom to the top, until at last, on New Year’s Eve, he reached the recently-opened rooftop bar, ‘Olympus’.
Hotel ‘Venets’ was part of a larger complex of buildings, that were specially constructed to mark the anniversary in Ulyanovsk, a small Soviet town formerly known as Simbirsk, renamed in honour of its most famous son, Lenin (born Ulyanov). A photo album discovered amid the archives of the local history museum, published by the Leningrad architects who designed the hotel, contained photographs of the hotel when it first opened, revealing its original interiors. During its 47 years of operation, the hotel underwent many distinct renovations. For ‘SAPCE FORCE CONSTRUCTION’, I used one of these photographs as a reference for reconstructing a three-room luxury suite within the palazzo in Venice. Accompanying this is a selection of postcards featuring photographs of today’s Ulyanovsk, titled Ascension to ‘Olympus’ (a rooftop bar called ‘Olympus’ recently opened in the Venets.). These images capture my experience of travelling to Ulyanovsk on the eve of the centennial anniversary of the October Revolution. Checking into the hotel, I worked my way up from the first floor to the very top, spending one night in each room, until at last, on New Year’s Eve, I reached ‘Olympus’.
Order No. 150

VENETS. WELCOME TO THE IDEAL

Book
ISBN 9–785990–951914.
Softcover, 200×260 mm, 320 pages, 500 copies. English.
Gluschenkoizdat, 2017
Buy €35
THE ARCHITECTURAL REVIEW (by Owen Hatherley): This wonderful book documents the architectural results of another Soviet anniversary – the celebrations of the centenary of Lenin’s birth in Ulyanovsk, formerly Simbirsk, the small city on the Volga where he was born. Told by the authorities in Moscow that the ‘door would be open’ for them to modernise their mainly wooden, one-storey, Tsarist city for the duration of the celebrations, and that they’d close it immediately when it was over, the local Party rushed to build a Museum, a Library, a Palace of Culture, housing, an Airport and the high-rise Hotel Venets before the tap of money and resources was turned off. In its first year of opening, two Poles, 70 Britons, and more than 3,000 East Germans arrived to stay in the Hotel Venets, and we get to read the inventory of difficult questions they answered (‘can we see how people live in those little wooden houses?’), and find out how hotel staff took it out on the guests.